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Make Repurposed Tin Can Wall Pocket Planters (Pocket Posey)

Tin can wall pocket planters are all the rage! This handcrafted tin can pocket posey is filled with beautiful faux flowers and can be hung or stood on a shelf.

I’m always looking for ways to recycle things and use them in a new way. So when I saw these tin can wall pocket planters, I knew I had to make one!

Not only are they super cute, but they’re also really easy to make. You just need a few inexpensive supplies and a little bit of time.

And the best part? You can customize them any way you want. So grab some old cans and get started!

set of 4 tin can pocket planters on pink background

Supplies for Tin Can Wall Pocket Planters

How to Make Tin Can Wall Pocket Planters

Step 1. Prepare the Tin Cans

The first thing you need to do is gather your tin cans and remove the labels. If you have any glue residue left on the can you can use a little goo gone adhesive remover.

Give them a quick wash to remove any leftover food inside.

removing labels from tin cans

Step 2. Crush the Bottom of the Tin Cans

In order to flatten the cans, you have to use cans that have the same top and bottom. 

You won’t be able to use a can opener to remove the bottom from cans with a rounded bottom.

Whenever I go to the grocery store now I’m always checking the bottoms of the cans!

I used two different sizes for these pocket posies. Hunt’s tomato paste and spaghettios.

tin cans for pocket posies

I’m on the hunt for the extra-large cans so I can make a planter to use outside with real flowers.

Place the tin can on its side so the seam is up. Then you can use your hand to flatten the can. It doesn’t take much pressure at all.

crushing tin can

Step 3. Use a Hammer to Close the Bottom of the Tin Cans

Now it’s time to take out a little aggression on the tin cans! Trust me, this is good therapy. 🙂 Use a hammer or mallet to seal the tin can.

using hammer to crush tin cans

Since I am using silk flowers it doesn’t have to be completely closed, but if you are adding real flowers and soil you want to make sure it is nice and sealed.

flattened tin cans for pocket posies

Step 4. Paint the Tin Cans

Gather your favorite paint to paint the tin cans. I used pretty soft colors in pink and sage green, plus white chalk paint.

painting tin cans

This is where you can really have fun with it and create a rainbow of colors if you want!

painted tin cans for wall planters

Warning – you will want to make “all the tin cans”.

Let the paint dry fully before moving on to the decoupage technique.

I have to say this is my favorite part and I really LOVE to decoupage. If you are a fan too you can check out some of my popular decoupage projects with tips for decoupage below:

Step 5. Gather your Decoupage Material

You can use so many things to decoupage your cans. I gathered napkins, rice paper, and my free printables.

napkins for decoupage

What Materials Can You Use to Decoupage?

Step 6. Add Mod Podge

Place a layer of mod podge onto your crushed tin can. I use foam brushes for painting and adding mod podge.

Let it sit for about 30 seconds or so until it gets a little tacky then lightly place your napkin or other material onto the mod podge.

adding napkin to tin can for decoupage

If you are using napkins, only use the top printed layer. I also find tearing your material rather than cutting it makes for a cleaner look on the tin cans. It almost looks painted on!

tearing napkins for tin can planters

Step 7. Burnish Image with Plastic Wrap

A super helpful tip for decoupage is to use plastic wrap to “burnish” the image and remove any wrinkles. It really helps to prevent any tearing in your material and gives it a smoother finish.

smoothing napkin on tin can

Step 8. Add a Top Layer of Mod Podge 

You will need about 2-3 coats of mod podge on top of your tin cans. You can use more if you like but I found this was enough.

But, if you are using heavier paper like brochures, you may need more.  Let the image dry for at least 30 minutes between coats.

Step 9. Seal with a Coat of Clear Sealant

You can use a clear sealer if you want to give it a shiny finish. You will also need this if you are using these pocket posies outside.

I didn’t add a sealer to these as I like the matte finish. This is totally your personal preference.

Step 10. Fill with Flowers

Now fill your tin wall pockets with flowers. I found all of these pretty spring flowers at the dollar store. You don’t even need foam for the can. I just used a little bit of moss to secure it.

Crushed tin can pocket planter

Here it is hanging on an old ladder with a piece of ribbon. You can also hang these on a wall with twine or floral wire.

Finished Tin Can Wall Pocket Planters

I made four different tin can planters and can’t decide which one I like best. You may notice a little bit of gold on this pretty vintage style planter:

tin can wall planter with flowers

I used my finger to rub a bit of gold gilding paint onto the planter. I’m pretty obsessed with how it turned out.

This is what I used:

gilding wax

This tin can planter was made using rice paper:

tin can planter with rice paper

I added gold to this one as well. It really pops on the soft pink backdrop.

If you are a fan of all things little red truck you will love this next one:

little truck printable on tin can planter

The fourth tin can wall planter I made also uses my spring printables and is an adorable design for Easter or spring:

spring watering can tin can planter

I kept one can uncrushed to make this beautiful spring vase:

spring vase tin can planter

Can you believe this was a soup can? Save all those tin cans so you can make your own hanging wall planters!

You can add wire, twine, or ribbon for hanging, or display them standing on a shelf. The smaller tin cans are the perfect size for tiered trays.

set of 3 tin can pocket posies

Just because I took a million and one pictures, here are a few more:

tin can vase with decoupage napkin
2 mini tin can planters
tin can wall pocket planter with pink flowers

There you have it! Four beautiful and simple DIY tin can wall pocket planters that you can make for just a couple of dollars!

I hope you enjoy these pretty planters as much as I enjoyed making them. If so, please share this post with your friends.

It really helps my blog…and it doesn’t cost anything. 🙂

If you create anything with my free printables be sure to share your photos with me on Facebook and Instagram and use the hashtag #freeprintablecrafts.

tin can wall pocket planter with pink flowers

Crushed Tin Can Wall Planters

Yield: 1 Tin Can Planter
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $5

I’m always looking for ways to recycle things and use them in a new way. So when I saw these tin can wall pocket planters, I knew I had to make some. They are slightly addictive to make and they turn out beautiful!

Materials

  • Empty Tin Cans
  • Download Free Printables or use napkins
  • Mod Podge
  • Moss
  • White Chalk Paint
  • Dixie Belle Soft Pink Paint
  • Foam Brush
  • Floral Foam
  • Faux Flowers

Tools

  • Hammer
  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Scissors

Instructions

    1. Gather your tin cans and remove the labels. If you have any glue residue left on the can you can use a little goo gone adhesive remover.
    2. Give them a quick wash to remove any leftover food inside.
    3. Place the tin can on its side so the seam is up. Then you can use your hand to flatten the can.
    4. Use a hammer or mallet to seal the tin can.
    5. Gather your favorite paint to paint the tin cans.
    6. Place a layer of mod podge onto your crushed tin can. use plastic wrap to “burnish” the image and remove any wrinkles. 

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Pinterest

Thank you so much for visiting. Happy crafting!

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Susan

Saturday 30th of July 2022

These are great! I can’t find the answer to my question in the directions…do you remove the bottom of the can or leave it on when you crush it? I can’t tell from the pictures and it’s not clear in the directions. Thank you

ourcraftymom

Monday 1st of August 2022

I'm so glad you like them! I will update the instructions. I remove the bottom first as it makes it much easier to crush. Let me know if you make them!

Shelia Luke

Tuesday 26th of July 2022

I love these! I am curious what do you mean when you say to burnish them with plastic? No one else has asked so perhaps this is a novice question, but I would love to make these. Also an idea of large number 10 cans is to visit any soup kitchen or church that serves a weekly meal. They go through a large quantity of these cans as well and they typically end up recycled. Thank you!

ourcraftymom

Tuesday 26th of July 2022

Hello! I'm so glad you like them. It basically is just a fancy way of saying smooth out the wrinkles, lol. Because it is so fragile it helps to use plastic so it won't tear. I learned the hard way. I'm definitely going to check out the soup kitchens. I have an idea for a large fall one. 😀

Kathy cortez

Monday 11th of July 2022

Those are beautiful tyfs

ourcraftymom

Sunday 17th of July 2022

thanks so much!

Doreen Powers

Sunday 10th of July 2022

Great upcycyling on these tin can fower pots!

ourcraftymom

Sunday 17th of July 2022

thank you!

Debi Ameline

Thursday 9th of June 2022

So frustrating with the round-bottom, un-openable cans!! I had been saving cans to do this project in mass. Of my 8 cans, only 1 fit the bill. Laughed when I read your comment about checking the cans before purchasing. Also asking neighbors to check their cans before recycling! Fabulous examples of these Pockets! ❤️

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